Step 6: Cameo Appearances.

A good Internet comic strip knows when to poke fun of public figures and lampoon famous people. I mean, the news is just full of hilarious antics by Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, and George Bush Jr.! Take a step towards an "editorial" cartoon and add these people into your comic! If you don't have the artistic skill to faithfully sketch out a drawing of your target, don't worry, there's plenty of ways around this, including:

1) Just showing the back of the person's head,
2) Representing them as a hilarious object that reflects their personality or job (ie, Steve Jobs could be an apple! Ha ha, that's hilarious!),
3) Writing the person's name on their shirt or listing their name and drawing large arrows which point to them.

Make sure that the character in your strip says something appropriate to the position he's in, and what his job is. For example:


GOOD

BAD

As you can plainly see, the the second comic makes little to no sense because most people know that the Pope does not in fact own Apple Computers. If I remember correctly, he doesn't even own IBM either. I believe he is not related to the computer industry at all and has something to do with religion. Keep this in mind when you're drawing a computer-based cartoon and really want to include the Pope.

Step 7: Making Your Webpage.

Although the Internet comic industry is indeed a fulfilling and rewarding professional, there is a slight problem that you may encounter: pageviews. Since your site gets paid on how many ads you serve, having a site which people only visit two pages a day might not result in a big fat check for you at the end of every month. To offset this, make your website navigation as extremely annoying and confusing as possible. This way people will spend a good portion of their day wading through pages and pages of your website, trying in vain to find the newest comic or whatever they're looking for. Label ever link as vaguely as possible. Force your readers to fight across hundreds of pages of ads before they are allowed to get to the actual comic. Make popup ads which spawn popup ads. Do whatever you can to make sure your dreams of writing about two guys, their female friend, and a random cute animal will live on forever!

Conclusion.

Although the Internet comic industry isn't meant for everybody, it was certainly meant for you. Even if you lack any artistic talent, comedic writing ability, or enough intelligence to turn your computer on without the assistance of another person, you will still find a home writing Internet comics. Don't take my word for it though, just read what Jeff Moses, creator of the hit Internet cartoon "Ax and Max", has to say!

Jeff Moses: "My drawings look like shit, yet I get paid to do them! In an ideal world I'd have been murdered by now! However, this is the Internet, and I'm rewarded for my grade-school like drawings which contain the same amount of humor as reading the label on a bottle of asprin! Thank you Information Superhighway!"

I couldn't have put it better myself!

– Rich "Lowtax" Kyanka (@lowtax)

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